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Press Releases

Changes in Management for Geobrugg North America, LLC

GEOBRUGG NORTH AMERICA, LLC: ERIK J. ROREM assumes new position of Business Development Manager; PIERCE RUNNELS, PE takes over as General Manager

Erik J. RoremAlgodones, New Mexico USA – March 3, 2014. Geobrugg AG, Switzerland, the world leader in natural hazard protection systems, is pleased to announce the appointment of Erik J. Rorem as new Business Development Manager for North America. His current position of General Manager, Geobrugg North America, LLC will be assumed by Pierce Runnels, PE.

Mr. Rorem is a pioneer of Geobrugg in America, established in 1985. He has successfully grown the affiliate company into a leader in natural hazard solutions across North America. Under his watch as General Manager for over 14 years, the North American affiliate has increased five-fold in sales and has recently moved to a newly-built manufacturing facility twice the size of the original Santa Fe factory. The full time staff has increased 1000%.

In his new position, Mr. Rorem will dedicate his efforts to take advantage of emerging markets in underground mining and to promote new product lines. He will also become Regional Manager for Mexico. Mr. Rorem will remain based in New Mexico.

[Editor] Click through for the rest of the press release from Geobrugg North America LLC [/Editor]

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Snow. Jesse Hall. The Quad. Memorial Union. Tiger Plaza.
Miscellaneous

Mizzou Memorial Union Gets Lift from TerraThane Geotechnical Foam

Univ. of Missouri’s Historic Memorial Union, Built to Honor WWI Dead, Gets New Life with TerraThane Geotechnical Foam

Snow. Jesse Hall. The Quad. Memorial Union. Tiger Plaza.MOUNT AIRY, NC—The Univ. of Missouri’s iconic Memorial Union, with its Gothic architecture and central bell tower, was built to commemorate the 117 Mizzou alumni who lost their lives in WWI, and has been under silent attack. Like all buildings built atop the ancient dry riverbeds of the tributary valleys of the Missouri River, the soil beneath is a mixture of sand, clay, and fine rock particles and highly susceptible to erosion from water. So, while hundreds of thousands of students walked the hallways of the building, water escaping steam pipes far beneath caused severe drying of the soil and destabilized it enough so that erosion created voids, or cavities in the soil, some as large as four feet. In turn, this caused the concrete slab floors atop the voids to become uneven, and the eventual danger of even greater problems loomed large.

A team of engineers went after the problem, including MU alums, Matt VanderTuig, P.E., of Bartlett & West, Jefferson City, MO, and Mark Whitehead, P.E. with extensive structural design and environmental engineering management experience. They suggested to Chris Hentges, president of SIRCAL Contracting, Jefferson City, the general contractor in charge of the job, that instead of using the older method of mudjacking, a highly involved and intrusive process of drilling large holes in the slabs—sometimes removing the slabs entirely—and pumping “mud”, ultra-heavy Portland cement-based grout, into the void, then leveling the slabs, that the university might better be served by using the newer polyurethane foam system method called “foamjacking” or “polyjacking.”

[Editor] Be sure to click through for the rest of the interesting project from GeoPrac sponsor NCFI Polyurethanes and TerraThane! [/Editor]

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Corvette rescued from sinkhole
Geologic Hazards

5 of 8 Corvettes Rescued from Sinkhole

Here is an update on the Corvette Museum Sinkhole. A contractor has been busy trying to extract some of the priceless Corvettes from the sinkhole that opened up under the museum floor. If you missed […]