Important Info

Featured Sponsor

Become an Author

GeoPrac.net is a community site, we are only as good as the content our members contribute! Whether it's a one time contribution, or a monthly or quarterly article, please consider becoming an author!

Latest Comments in...

Video of Highway 101 Landslide in California
Looks like the Facebook video gets cropped when I embedded it here. You ca
San Francisco Millennium Tower Has Settled 16 Inches
Misrepresents actual foundation geometry. Photos show deep excavation to ne
New FHWA Soil Nail Manual Addresses LRFD, Hollow Bars
Good evening from Barcelona, Spain. I am witting to you because of I am le
Engineering Geologists vs Geological Engineers vs Geotechnic
Geological engineer from Spain (looking for job smiley geoengineer.martin@gmail
Content
Geologic Hazards
VIDEO: Boaters film landslide furiously roaring down hill PDF Print E-mail
Written by Randy Post   
Sunday, 26 August 2012 23:00

Earlier this summer, there were several large landslides in B.C. Canada, including some with fatalities. Around that time, the landslide video below was captured by some boaters.

[Source: WTVR.com]

Last Updated on Saturday, 25 August 2012 10:28
 
Video: Amazing Debris Flow Footage from Virgen, Austria PDF Print E-mail
Written by Randy Post   
Monday, 13 August 2012 06:12

 The Landslide Blog posted this amazing video of a debris flow, or series of debris flows in the town of Virgen, Austria.  The flows happened towards the beginning of August after some heavy rainfall.  This is quite possibly the best video of this type I've ever seen.

video platformvideo managementvideo solutionsvideo player
 
City of Venice still sinking, study says PDF Print E-mail
Written by Randy Post   
Wednesday, 13 June 2012 16:37
The Rialto Bridge over Venice's Grand Canal

Most previous studies have indicated that the ground subsidence has stabilized under the famous City of Venice, Italy. However a recent study published in March indicates this may not be the case. The researchers used GPS and InSAR data from 2000 to 2010 and found the rate of subsidence on the order of 1 - 4 mm per year. [Source: CBS News via Geology.com. Image: Wikipedia/Saffron Blaze]

 
Italian quake causes widespread damage PDF Print E-mail
Written by Randy Post   
Tuesday, 22 May 2012 00:30
Cars were crushed by the ruins of the destroyed Clock Tower in Finale Emilia, Italy after a magnitude-6.0 earthquake shook the region early Sunday.

A magnitude 6.0 earthquake struck Italy on Sunday, killing several and leaving an estimated 3,000 people homeless. A number of renaissance era buildings were damaged or destroyed in a region known for it's production of Parmigiano and Grana cheeses. [Source: The Seattle Times via ASCE SmartBrief. Image: LUCA BRUNO / THE ASSOCIATED PRESS via Seattle Times]

 
Giant sinkhole threatens to swallow house, forces family (and its pets) to flee PDF Print E-mail
Written by Randy Post   
Tuesday, 08 May 2012 14:43

Florida sinkhole

A backyard-sized sinkhole opened up recently behind a Windermere, Florida home, causing the home to be deemed unsafe. The residents said one of their kids was enjoying a hammock in the area just the night before. All of the kids and pets living in the house were safe even though the roughly 100 foot by 100 foot sinkhole came within about 3 feet of the house. The residents were renting the house and the home owner had sinkhole insurance. [Source: MSN. Image: CBC.CA]

Raw Sinkhole Video

Here is some raw video footage of the sinkhole to give you a better perspective from the ground and the air.

Last Updated on Tuesday, 08 May 2012 21:44
 
Landslide threatens renowned Australian Sea Cliff Bridge PDF Print E-mail
Written by Randy Post   
Tuesday, 03 April 2012 10:44
Sea Cliff Bridge

The picturesque Sea Cliff Bridge South of Sydney, Australia has been built only 7 years and is already threatened by a landslide. Portions of the site have moved 1.5 m since 2006. The Australian Roads and Maritime Services (RMS) department reportedly has three options to consider for stabilizing the bridge, and all three involve the construction of a seawall. The project, which was completed in 2005, was designed to avoid rockfall but was not meant to deal with landslide issues. [Source: Illawarra Mercury. Image: SMH]

 
Couple narrowly avoids being crushed by coastal landslide PDF Print E-mail
Written by Randy Post   
Thursday, 23 February 2012 00:35
The couple were spared only because Ms Pollard stopped to pick up a shell for her young daughter

A couple walking on the beach narrowly missed being crushed by tons of sandstone crumbling from the cliff face. The incident took place in Dorset, UK at a beach that has been known for these types of landslides and slope failures. The woman stopped to pick up a sea shell and the debris came down just in front of them. [Source: Mail Online. Image: BNPS.CO.UK via Daily Mail]

 
Under pressure: raising Venice above water (using... water?) PDF Print E-mail
Written by Randy Post   
Wednesday, 25 January 2012 17:40
Flooding in Venice, Italy

The landmark City of Venice, Italy is known for it's world famous canals, architecture and for some...its flooding. Part of the problem has been blamed on ground subsidence from pumping of shallow ground water in the mid 1900's. A massive project dubbed MOSE has been in progress for some time to build inflatable gates to stop high tides from flooding the Venice lagoon.

A recent paper in the Journal Water Resources Research evaluates the possibility of injecting water into the formations to stop and perhaps even reverse the subsidence. The article from Ars Technica (link below) mentions that the technique was used with some success in the Long Beach, California area. The study authors had no boreholes in the area, but were able to rely on a large volume of high-quality seismic data obtained by the Italian Government from oil companies. Their simulations involved 15 boreholes around the City of Venice pumping seawater continuously for 10 years. At that point, they authors concluded there is the potential to lift the city 25-30 cm. [Source: Ars technica via Geoengineer.org. Image: De Saye / Rapho via arlindo-correia.com]

 
New Zealand city council bans entry to 500 homes over geotechnical hazards PDF Print E-mail
Written by Randy Post   
Monday, 05 December 2011 15:44

The Christ Church City Council has issued a notice banning entry to over 500 homes because of risks associated with rockfall, landslides, cliff collapse and other geotechnical problems exacerbated by recent earthquakes. [Source: Scoop News]

 
Christchurch liquefaction prone soils make rebuilding difficult | PDF Print E-mail
Written by Randy Post   
Monday, 19 September 2011 17:29
Liquefaction damage in Christchurch, New Zealand

This article notes that the combination of shallow water table and crummy soils make it difficult to rebuild safely in the Christchurch, New Zealand business district. Another interesting item mentioned in the article is that the report they are citing indicates that the high variability in liquefaction damage throughout the business district appears to correlate with the paleo channels beneath the city, where the loose, silty alluvial deposits near the old channels were the most susceptible to liquefaction, but the gravelly soils farther away were not. [Source: TVNZ. Image: TVNZ]

 
Terrifiying Landslide Video from South Korea PDF Print E-mail
Written by Randy Post   
Sunday, 31 July 2011 12:02

 An amateur video captured the incredible speed and fury of a landslide in South Korea triggered by days of torrential rains.

Last Updated on Sunday, 31 July 2011 14:39
 
Micro-copter UAVs mapping landslide PDF Print E-mail
Written by Randy Post   
Wednesday, 27 July 2011 17:48
The OctoKopter hovering on a previous project in Antartica

A professor from the University of Tasmania and as many as 20 of his students are using two 'OctoKopters' UAVs or unmanned aerial vehicles to create a detailed 3D map of a landslide in Ranelagh, Tasmania, Australia. The UAVs are deployed by Dr. Arko Lucieer and the TerraLuma project team as a cheap alternative to high-resolution satellite imagery. Flying at altitudes ranging from just 50 m to 120 m, they can photograph micro-topography in remarkable detail. The OctoKopter UAV platform runs about $3,000AU (about $3,200US) but with the payload of a digital SLR camera, six-band multispectral sensor and thermal sensor, the cost is more like $60,000AU each (about $65,000US). On a previous project in Antarctica, the team was able to produce 3D point clouds with a 1cm point spacing. Dr. Lucieer is also investigating using the two OctoKopters and a larger third on order by the UTAS School of Geography and Environmental Studies as a cheaper alternative platform for aerial LIDAR surveys. [Source: University of Tasmania, Australia. Image: lucieer.net]

 
<< Start < Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Next > End >>

Page 6 of 20