TerraThane geotechnical polyurethane saves slab at hydraulic fracturing station
Press Releases

Kansas City Company Uses US Product, TerraThane, to Keep Natural Gas Flowing in Nation’s Ninth Largest Gas Reserve

TerraThane geotechnical polyurethane saves slab at hydraulic fracturing stationFORT LUPTON, CO—An unfortunate inlet line break at one of Anadarko Petroleum’s hydraulic fracturing stations in Weld County, Colorado just north of Denver, allowed injection fluid to wash out the end of the pumping station and get beneath the concrete slab foundation causing erosion. The voids created beneath the slabs were from three inches to five inches and left the slab floor uneven. The general contractor for the station, Open Range Services, initially thought to use the legacy method of mudjacking, or pressure grouting: pouring a thick grout of mixed concrete and other aggregates into the void, or backfill, but the “mud” is heavy which can affect the surrounding soil, time consuming, and difficult to apply and clean, and backfilling would have required the costly process of ripping out the slab and replacing it. Instead, they contacted Pro Foundation Technology, based in Kansas City, MO, to learn more about a contemporary technology called “foamjacking” or “polyjacking,” which uses lighter weightgeotechnical polyurethane foam instead of grout.

[Editor] Click through for the rest of the press release from GeoPrac.net sponsor, NCFI Polyurethanes! [/Editor]

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Miscellaneous

Pinkerton Tunnel
Press Releases

Historic Pennsylvania Tunnel Reopens with Help From NCFI’s TerraThane Polyurethane Foam

Pinkerton TunnelMOUNT AIRY, NC—A $2 million tunnel construction project on the Great Alleghany Passage (GAP) is reopened to the public with help from a geotechnical polyurethane foam called TerraThane, by US company, NCFI Polyurethanes.

The GAP rail-trail is 150 miles of hiking and biking between Cumberland, Md, and Pittsburgh, Pa. created along the former railway line. In Cumberland, the GAP joins the C&O Canal Towpath, creating a continuous 335-mile long trail experience all the way to Washington, DC. It’s become a favorite biking destination for people from around the Mid-Atlantic states. One of its main tunnels, the Pinkerton Tunnel, an 849-foot former Western Maryland Railway tunnel, has been closed since 1975 due to erosion and unstable conditions. The Allegheny Trail Alliance, the organization that built and now maintains the 150-mile GAP, and the Somerset County Rails-to-Trails Association (SCRTA), wanted the tunnel reopened and helped fund the project.

[Editor] Click through for the rest of the press release from GeoPrac sponsor, NCFI Polyurethanes (makers of TerraThane). [/Editor]

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On June 2, 2014, the Delaware Department of Transportation closed a bridge on I–495 that was leaning and out of plumb.
Articles

How Could a Pile of Dirt Cause a Major Interstate Bridge To Tilt?

On June 2, 2014, the Delaware Department of Transportation closed a bridge on I–495 that was leaning and out of plumb.[Editor] The Delaware Department of Transportation (DelDOT) had a major problem on their hands after a bridge on I-495 was leaning…one side of the bridge was 18 inches higher than the other.  The culprit?  A pile of fill adjacent to the bridge was loading soft soils beneath.  So what do you do about it?  In this contributed article by Dennis M. O’Shea, bridge engineer in the FHWA Delaware Division Office, he describes the problems faced by DelDOT, the causes, and how they fixed it.  The article originally appeared in Public Roads Magazine, and is republished here with permission. [/Editor]

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Nortex employees stabilizing Houston area freeway with TerraThane Polyurethane Foam
Press Releases

Nortex and TerraThane Stabilize Houston Area Highways

Houston’s Highways, Some of Busiest in Nation, Use Innovative TerraThane Polyurethane Foam Technology to Repair Bad Bridge Approaches, Uneven Joints, and Roadway Depressions.

Nortex employees stabilizing Houston area freeway with TerraThane Polyurethane Foam

MOUNT AIRY, NC—Highways around Houston, TX, known as one the nation’s worst cities for traffic behind Los Angeles, D.C., and Atlanta, need constant repair, but can’t be closed while the work is done. Nortex Concrete Lift and Stabilization, Inc., a Ft. Worth, TX company, recently completed a whirlwind repair project on one of the city’s busiest corridors in the NE quadrant where I-10, 610 Loop, I-59, and I-69 feed millions of cars daily to, from, and around Harris County.

Normal groundwater erosion beneath the highways causes the concrete highway slabs to drop, roadway depressions, uneven bridge approaches, and uneven joints that make driving bumpy and uncomfortable, dangerous, and causes severe wear and tear on automobiles.

To make the repairs, the Texas Department of Transportation, TXDOT, brought in Nortex. The company carefully planned out the repairs for the half million pound project, and sent out four crews each with it’s own box truck rig to use a relatively new technology called “foamjacking.” Foamjacking uses high-density polyurethane foam to fill the subterranean voids, and lift the concrete slabs to proper level. “We’ve been lifting and stabilizing roadways with polyurethane foam since we got into the business back in 2003,” says Casey Derosa, asst. gen. mgr. of Nortex. “It’s a far superior method versus the old way of mudjacking.” Mudjacking is a ubiquitous term for a mix of mud, sand, cement, crushed limestone, and water hydraulically pumped into large holes drilled into the concrete slabs to fill voids and level the slabs. Mudjacking uses more and much larger equipment, and requires larger holes to be drilled. It typically requires the roadway to be closed much longer than foamjacking, and takes more time to clean up.

[Editor] Click through for the rest of the press release from GeoPrac sponsor NCFI Polyurethanes. [/Editor]

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NCFI Polyurethanes
Press Releases

NCFI Polyurethanes Rolls Up Family of Branded Websites Into Single Online Community: www.ncfi.com

NCFI PolyurethanesMOUNT AIRY, NC—NCFI Polyurethanes officially launched its new online informative and educational content presence today: www.NCFI.com. The new website replaces the former corporate site, and eight former brand-specific sites.

“We found we need to roll everything up under the NCFI umbrella,” says Chip Holton, President of NCFI. “We turned fifty last year, and our name is well-known and trusted for experience producing the highest quality American engineered and manufactured products. We wanted our web presence to reflect that, and help our customers around the world get what they need quickly and with ease.”

[Editor] Click through for the rest of the press release from GeoPrac.net sponsor, NCFI Polyurethanes [/Editor]

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Keynetix_Geotechnical_Academy_1
Press Releases

Keynetix to Support the Geotechnical Academy

Keynetix are delighted to have been offered the opportunity to be a regular contributor to the Geotechnical Academy starting in June 2014. The Geotechnical Academy is a collaboration between Equipe Group and Geotechnical Engineering Ltd, […]


NewGeoWorldForumsImage
Press Releases

Announcing the GeoWorld Technical Forums: Connecting you with geoprofessionals who answer your technical questions!

July 10, 2013 – The GeoWorld professional network is pleased to announce the development of its latest innovative online tool: The Geo-Technical Forums! The new forums were a request by a number of individuals and […]