Nicholson Construction Company
Press Releases

Nicholson Awarded Earth Retention Contract for Seattle Light Rail Project

Nicholson Construction CompanyPITTSBURGH, PA – January 15, 2010 – Nicholson was awarded a subcontract by Traylor Bros./Frontier-Kemper JV that includes temporary shoring and the construction of the permanent reinforced concrete diaphragm walls for the a new light rail station near the University of Washington’s Husky Stadium in Seattle. The project owner is Sound Transit and the work will be completed in a joint venture with Condon-Johnson & Associates. [Editor] Click through for the entire press release from GeoPrac.net sponsor Nicholson Construction. [/Editor] […]


Nicholson Construction Company
Press Releases

Nicholson Awarded a Contract on the MTA’s Second Avenue Subway Project

Nicholson Construction CompanyPITTSBURGH, PA – January 18, 2010 – Nicholson was recently awarded a subcontract by E.E. Cruz and Tully Construction Co., a Joint Venture that includes approximately 200,000 SF of diaphragm walls for the construction of the 96th Street station box as part of New York City’s Second Avenue Subway project. Nicholson’s contract also includes jet grouting for a subgrade strut, water cutoff, and temporary support of excavation; compensation grouting for two buildings at excavations for ancillary structures; micropiles within an existing building; and curtain grouting in rock. The project owner is the Metropolitan Transit Authority. [Editor] Click through for the entire press release from GeoPrac.net sponsor Nicholson Construction. [/Editor] […]

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Failures

Cologne Tunnel Collapse: Investigations Focus on Tiebacks and Groundwater

image The latest information to come out of the collapse of a subway tunnel excavation in Cologne, Germany is that investigators are evaluating the ground anchors or tiebacks that were holding open the subway tunnel excavation. There doesn’t appear to be much information available to the public yet, and the New Civil Engineer article mostly quoted academics saying an anchor failure “could” have caused the collapse. Apparently at the time of the collapse, the excavation had reached the bottom depth after the slurry walls had been constructed along with the ground anchor system. Crews were supposedly working on the base slab which would have undoubtedly stiffened up the whole system. For what its worth, an anonymous comment left at the bottom of that article indicated that after half of the debris had been excavated, the diaphragm walls were still intact and without apparent displacement. So what other theories have been floated? Read on for more info.  (Image Credit: New Civil Engineer)

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