On June 2, 2014, the Delaware Department of Transportation closed a bridge on I–495 that was leaning and out of plumb.
Articles

How Could a Pile of Dirt Cause a Major Interstate Bridge To Tilt?

On June 2, 2014, the Delaware Department of Transportation closed a bridge on I–495 that was leaning and out of plumb.[Editor] The Delaware Department of Transportation (DelDOT) had a major problem on their hands after a bridge on I-495 was leaning…one side of the bridge was 18 inches higher than the other.  The culprit?  A pile of fill adjacent to the bridge was loading soft soils beneath.  So what do you do about it?  In this contributed article by Dennis M. O’Shea, bridge engineer in the FHWA Delaware Division Office, he describes the problems faced by DelDOT, the causes, and how they fixed it.  The article originally appeared in Public Roads Magazine, and is republished here with permission. [/Editor]

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Press Releases

Keynetix Launch Ground Breaking Mapping Technology for Geotechnical Engineers at Geotechnica 2013

Keynetix launched their latest build of HoleBASE SI Professional at Geotechnica 2013 and this release includes technology to enable geotechnical engineers to instantly preview their site investigation data alongside BGS data and aerial photography coverage.

The BGS OpenGeoscience mapping sets, including the 1:50,000 Bedrock and Superficial Deposits, are now available to turn on in the background of the HoleBASE SI project mapping window together with Microsoft’s Bing mapping and aerial photography. Maps are licenced for commercial use, including the supply of hard copy reports. Mapping data is streamed from the internet, so customers do not need the IT infrastructure to store and serve the large mapping sets.

[Editor] Read on for the rest of this press release from Keynetix! [/Editor]

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Miscellaneous

NCFI Geotechnical Foam, TerraThane, Helps Contractor Save Chicagoland Apartments With Minimal Disruption to Tenants

Wed June 5th 017

MOUNT AIRY, NC—A newly purchased 17-building apartment complex in Rolling Meadows, IL, built in the early 1960s, has seen plenty of tenants make their homes there. When new owners went about making renovations they discovered one 18,000 sq. ft. building suffering from voids in the soil beneath the slabs ranging from five inches to almost two feet in diameter caused by the stratified compacting of the historically hydric wetlands sedimentary soil, and water and sewer main breaks over the years. The voids caused some uneven floors and left the door open for future problems like mold.

[Editor] Read on for the remainder of the press release from GeoPrac.net sponsor NCFI Polyurethanes. [/Editor]

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Miscellaneous

Happy Earth Science Week – Oct 11-17

This week is Earth Science Week sponsored by the American Geological Institute. The theme for this year according to EarthScienceWeek.org is “Understanding Climate”. Their objectives are: To engage students in discovering the Earth sciences. To […]