TerraThane geotechnical polyurethane saves slab at hydraulic fracturing station
Press Releases

Kansas City Company Uses US Product, TerraThane, to Keep Natural Gas Flowing in Nation’s Ninth Largest Gas Reserve

TerraThane geotechnical polyurethane saves slab at hydraulic fracturing stationFORT LUPTON, CO—An unfortunate inlet line break at one of Anadarko Petroleum’s hydraulic fracturing stations in Weld County, Colorado just north of Denver, allowed injection fluid to wash out the end of the pumping station and get beneath the concrete slab foundation causing erosion. The voids created beneath the slabs were from three inches to five inches and left the slab floor uneven. The general contractor for the station, Open Range Services, initially thought to use the legacy method of mudjacking, or pressure grouting: pouring a thick grout of mixed concrete and other aggregates into the void, or backfill, but the “mud” is heavy which can affect the surrounding soil, time consuming, and difficult to apply and clean, and backfilling would have required the costly process of ripping out the slab and replacing it. Instead, they contacted Pro Foundation Technology, based in Kansas City, MO, to learn more about a contemporary technology called “foamjacking” or “polyjacking,” which uses lighter weightgeotechnical polyurethane foam instead of grout.

[Editor] Click through for the rest of the press release from GeoPrac.net sponsor, NCFI Polyurethanes! [/Editor]

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Grain bin at a Williamsburg, Virgina poultry processing facility that had foundation settlement issues
Press Releases

Grain Bin Settlement Problems Common to Concrete Foundations Solved with NCFI’s Geotechnical Polyurethane Foam Technology

Grain bin at a Williamsburg, Virgina poultry processing facility that had foundation settlement issuesNew Solution Saves Money and Time Preventing Loss of Grain and Equipment Damage

MOUNT AIRY, NC—Soil consolidation and settlement happens. It’s a fact of farm life. Secondary consolidation slowly forces water out of the spaces between soil particles. As this happens, soil particles move close together and settling occurs. Floors drop and become uneven. Newer grain silos and bins are using concrete floors instead of metal, and as secondary consolidation occurs beneath them, depressed or “settled” areas, form within the bin. Grain accumulates in the depressed areas, but cannot be retrieved by the bin sweeper. In fact, the sweeper, a kind of auger that transports grain up from the floor, can become damaged from prolonged exposure to the uneven floor.

This is exactly what Kirk Roberts of CJGeo, a Williamsburg, Virginia-based commercial foundation repair and geotechnical contractor, found when he got the job to repair the foundation of a massive 106-foot diameter grain bin at a poultry processing facility on the Eastern Shore of Maryland. “Once they removed the hundreds of thousands of bushels of grain, we found the floor had dropped some three inches in one section of the bin leaving a large pocket of grain out of reach of the bin sweeper.”

[Editor] Read on for the rest of this press release from GeoPrac sponsor NCFI Polyurethanes. [/Editor]

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NCFI Polyurethanes
Press Releases

NCFI Polyurethanes Rolls Up Family of Branded Websites Into Single Online Community: www.ncfi.com

NCFI PolyurethanesMOUNT AIRY, NC—NCFI Polyurethanes officially launched its new online informative and educational content presence today: www.NCFI.com. The new website replaces the former corporate site, and eight former brand-specific sites.

“We found we need to roll everything up under the NCFI umbrella,” says Chip Holton, President of NCFI. “We turned fifty last year, and our name is well-known and trusted for experience producing the highest quality American engineered and manufactured products. We wanted our web presence to reflect that, and help our customers around the world get what they need quickly and with ease.”

[Editor] Click through for the rest of the press release from GeoPrac.net sponsor, NCFI Polyurethanes [/Editor]

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Seneca Rocks Visitor's Center was experiencing geotechnical foundation problems
Press Releases

“Foamjacking” Solution for Seneca Rocks USFS Visitor’s Center

Seneca Rocks Visitor's Center was experiencing geotechnical foundation problemsU.S. Forestry Service Saves Thousands with Use of TerraThane Geotechnical Foam by NCFI Polyurethanes at Seneca Rocks Discovery Center

MOUNT AIRY, NC— Seneca Rocks Discovery Center, the visitor’s center for the eastern U.S.’s most popular rock-climbing destination located in Pendleton County, WV, had a growing problem common to concrete slab foundations: erosion of the soil beneath the slabs created voids that left areas of the center with uneven spots and settled anywhere from one-to three inches. That led to cracks in interior walls, uneven floors, and trip hazards for the thousands of visitors to the area’s most popular scenic attraction. Seneca Rocks is a striking 900 ft peak that features over 375 mapped climbing routes varying in degree of difficulty from easier 5.0 to the hardest 5.13, and attracts climbers from around the world.

[Editor] Click through to find out how geotechnical foam manufactured by GeoPrac.net’s sponsor, NCFI Polyurethanes, was used to repair this important structure! [/Editor]

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Wed June 5th 017
Miscellaneous

NCFI Geotechnical Foam, TerraThane, Helps Contractor Save Chicagoland Apartments With Minimal Disruption to Tenants

Wed June 5th 017

MOUNT AIRY, NC—A newly purchased 17-building apartment complex in Rolling Meadows, IL, built in the early 1960s, has seen plenty of tenants make their homes there. When new owners went about making renovations they discovered one 18,000 sq. ft. building suffering from voids in the soil beneath the slabs ranging from five inches to almost two feet in diameter caused by the stratified compacting of the historically hydric wetlands sedimentary soil, and water and sewer main breaks over the years. The voids caused some uneven floors and left the door open for future problems like mold.

[Editor] Read on for the remainder of the press release from GeoPrac.net sponsor NCFI Polyurethanes. [/Editor]

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Using TerraThane products for lifting concrete pavement of I-85 in Atlanta, a Hayward Baker project.
Press Releases

NCFI Polyurethanes and the Geotechnical and Geoenvironmental Business

Using TerraThane products for lifting concrete pavement of I-85 in Atlanta, a Hayward Baker project.

NCFI Polyurethanes’ TerraThane Product Line Quickly and Quietly Improving Bottom Line for North American Geotechnical and Geoenvironmental Businesses

MOUNT AIRY, NC—The distinctly American company, NCFI Polyurethanes, is known for pioneering innovative, improved, and unique uses for one of their main product offerings: polyurethane foam. Since the company’s scientists and engineers began formulating polyurethane foam back in 1967, other chemical systems companies have been saying, “wonder what they’ll come up with next?” So, it was really more of a “holy cow” moment in the 1990s when NCFI began formulating foam systems for geotechnical uses: highway and roadway repair, bridge approach repair, concrete lifting, leveling and void fill. And it’s no surprise that like all NCFI product lines, TerraThane geotechnical foam is quietly changing the way entire industries work for the better.

[Editor] Read more about the many applications of GeoPrac.net sponsor NCFI’s TerraThane in Geotechnical and Geoenvironmental projects! [/Editor]

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new-bern
Press Releases

Troubled Eastern NC Riverfront Convention Center Gets Lifeline from Hayward Baker and TerraThane™ Geotech Foam by NCFI Polyurethanes

new-bern

MOUNT AIRY, NC—The 12-year-old riverfront Convention Center in New Bern, NC was in trouble. The building’s exterior is supported by pilings driven deep in the ground, but the floors sit directly on the earth and silt of the old riverbed. The land was in-filled by old docks and building debris in the 1970s and settling, erosion, and construction mistakes were taking their toll on the building.

Parts of the floor and patio sunk up to seven inches, cracks and uneven joints in the concrete slab floors were causing walking/tripping hazards, and gaps beneath walls were allowing sound to pass between what were designed as soundproof rooms.

[Editor] Click through for the rest of the press release from NCFI.  Disclosure: Hayward Baker is a sponsor of GeoPrac.net. [/Editor]

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Underground parking garage in 'Uptown' area of Dallas that needed TerraThane polyurethane foam
Press Releases

Posh Dallas Parking Center Saves Millions with TerraThane Geotechnical Polyurethane Foam by NCFI

Underground parking garage in 'Uptown' area of Dallas that needed TerraThane polyurethane foam

MOUNT AIRY, NC—In-ground parking garages in Dallas, TX experience the same thing: erosion of the soil beneath them, and silt infiltration that overwhelms and clogs the drainage system, thus causing more and worse erosion. The keys are catching it early enough, and choosing the right solution to keep it from happening again.

The three-story, in-ground parking garage at McKinney Ave. and Worthington St., the main thoroughfare of the Dallas’ “Uptown” area and home to some of the poshest apartments, business addresses, shopping, hotels, restaurants and bars, had silt and water infiltration, so the owners called in Edens Structural Solutions, Bixby, OK, with 30 years experience of structural lifting and repair. David Edens, company president, says they studied the problem and decided on geotechnical polyurethane foam. “Our solution was to use void-filling TerraThane geotech foam. It’s simple to apply, expands and cures in place, and is an excellent water and air barrier,” says Edens.

[Editor] Click through for the rest of the press release from NCFI [/Editor]

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2011-08-31_11-46-33_299
Press Releases

Challenging WV Transmission Station Pipeline Job on 58-Degree Slope Uses TerraThane by U.S. Company, NCFI Polyurethanes

2011-08-31_11-46-33_299

MOUNT AIRY, NC—A recent pipeline job at Dominion Resource’s extraction/fractionation plant in Pine Grove, WV presented some pretty hairy challenges. First the pipeline was to be laid on a 58-degree hillside. Trucks, excavators, and other equipment had to be wenched up the slope and held in place by cables attached to heavy equipment. Secondly, it was the rainy season, so erosion of the freshly turned earth was a major concern. [Editor] Click through for the rest of the press release. [/Editor]

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